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Thread: Recording all game sounds, including your own voice

  1. #1

    Recording all game sounds, including your own voice

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    The superior method
    Fraps is the superior game recorder, it costs money but it makes everything really easy
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    << Click here for Fraps website >>

    There is a trial version of fraps that can record up to 30 sec clips, so you can try before you buy !

    Fraps makes game recording easy, very easy

    I recommend you set it up as in the picture below,
    • Sound Capture Settings - records the game sounds & ingame voip voices & teamspeak voices, basically everything you hear while gaming
    • Record External Input - records your voip through your headset mic, I recommend an open mic as the only capture while pressing option can cause sound clipping on your own voice

    With these settings fraps will record your voice along with the game sounds and squad voips etc, its that easy, test it for yourself !




    General good advice on recording with fraps
    • Fraps reduces the FPS while gaming to the recording settings, so record at 45 or 50 FPS, this will probably mean half screen recording
    • Record footage on a separate hard drive from the one with windows and the game on, the bottleneck for recording footage is the hard drive and not the graphics card
    • Test recording with the only capture while pushing option, on my system I was getting clipping on the recording of my voice, it may be different for you, its worth a test
    • If recording with an open mic then be aware that (1) everything you say is recorded, that means everything off squad mic too (2) breathing is recorded, so move your mic lower down below your lips level
    • What fraps records for sound may not be what you hear while gaming. For example fraps tends to record game sound as much louder than voices. So do a few tests of different sound levels on different factors and find out what settings work for you. The rule of thumb is that the fraps footage should have all voices (yours & teamspeak & ingame voip) at the same volume and voices should be louder than the gunfire (and other game sounds) so that the voices can always be heard.
    • The sound factors that you can experiment with are;
      • Windows audio options - mic boost
      • Windows audio options - mic volume
      • General desktop sound volume
      • Teamspeak - settings / options / playback - voice volume adjustment
      • In-game options - Game effects
      • In-game options - Game music
      • In-game options - Game voice over
      • In-game options - voip transmit & receive
      • In-game options - boost mic gain


    Important Note
    Playclaw is a serious contender to fraps for recording all voices, see here
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    Last edited by Exploding_Silver; 25.09.2011 at 16:23.

  2. #2

    Re: Recording all game sounds, including your own voice

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    The lesser method
    For the free recorders like xfire and wegame
    Requires manually unmuting your mic and hearing the feedback hiss & your own voice while gaming

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    My original thread on this is here

    The problem: Free recorders allow you to record your mic or 'what you hear', so people find they can record gameplay with everything but their own voice !

    The solution: You unmute your mic to feedback your own voice through your speakers/headphones and then the recorder will record your voice as well


    Use this procedure to adjust your settings till you find the right levels

    This procedure is best done if you can have a friend give you verbal feedback on your voip volume & quality throughout
    1. In windows audio options there are 4 factors to manipulate, change a few factors and procede to step two
      • Mic boost, probably best with it on ! eg on my machine it looks like this
      • Mic volume, try at 80% ! eg on my machine it looks like this
      • Mic mute, you must unmute this, this is critical for success ! eg on my machine it looks like this
      • General sound volume, this is the least likely factor to change, in general just leave it at your day to day setting eg on my machine it looks like this
    2. Goto the recorder you are using and change settings there, like sound capture settings, eg on my machine fraps looks like this
    3. If you want teamspeak voices recorded as well, then goto settings / options / playback and change settings there
    4. Perform a 'tap test', this is where you tap the end of your microphone to check that it is unmuted
    5. Boot up the game and get to the main menu
    6. Perform a 'tap test' to check that the game has not muted your mic, if so alt-tab and unmute it
    7. Go into the game sound options and manipulate what's available there, eg these options may be
      • Game effects, lower down, so that the human voices are louder
      • Game music, lower right down so as not to get in the way of the game sounds or human voices
      • Game voice over, lower right down as you want the human voices to be considerably loader than the pre-recorded game voices
      • Enable voip = YES !!!!
      • Transmit and receive volumes, usually set to 100%
      • Boost mic gain, set as on, this usually links directly to the windows audio options
      • Example of BF2142 sound options to manipulate here
    8. Perform a 'tap test' to check that the game has not muted your mic, if so alt-tab and unmute it
    9. Load a game map and get in a squad with a friend who is helping you test
    10. Perform a 'tap test' to check that the game has not muted your mic, if so alt-tab and unmute it
    11. Perform a mic check for ingame voip eg say "mic check" and friend responds on ingame voip "loud & clear"
    12. Perform a mic check for teamspeak eg say "mic check" and friend responds "loud & clear"
    13. Say to your friend "starting recording" and start recording the game with a program like fraps
    14. As you are firing your machine gun perform a mic check for ingame voip eg say "mic check" and friend responds on ingame voip "loud & clear". You have just recorded your voice and your friends voice on ingame voip while the loudest and most common game sound is happening, eg your machine gun. If your friend says your voip is quieter or less clear then ask if it is still workable.
    15. As you are firing your machine gun perform a mic check for teamspeak eg say "mic check" and friend responds on teamspeak "loud & clear". You have just recorded your voice and your friends voice on teamspeak while the loudest and most common game sound is happening, eg your machine gun. If your friend says your voip is quieter or less clear then ask if it is still workable.
    16. Stop recording and say to your friend "ended recording, checking footage now"
    17. Alt tab and go check the footage by playing it in windows media player
    18. This is the crunch test, what does the footage sound like. Quite often people find that the various volumes of voices and game sounds are different on the footage than experienced ingame. For example I often found my game sounds like gunfire was much louder on the footage than I experienced ingame. On the footage different sounds should be of different volumes
      • Loudest should be human voices, whether your voice or squad mates ingame voip or teamspeak, all voices should be equal volume as eachother and the loudest sounds on the footage, so that human voices can always be heard over gamesounds.
      • Medium level, should be the game sounds like gunfire and grenades and explosions, these should all be quieter than the human voices
      • And quietest of all should be game music and/or other application sounds like steam or xfire etc
    19. Are the results good enough ? if not then go back to step 1, adjust things and test again. When setting up recording for a new game it often takes me several runs through this procedure over an hour, to tweek things just right and I know what I am doing !

    • When you have your settings just right, take screenprints of all the windows audio settings and game settings, so that you can easily & quickly reproduce it all in the future.
    • If you want to record a new game then run through the procedure above for that game too, they probably be close to other game settings, but don't assume that, you do need to test.
    General advice
    • Some games will mute your microphone automatically so you may have to alt-tab to unmute it again, eg BF2142 mutes mic during map load. The tap test is the general method for knowing if the mic is unmuted.
    • The tap test sometimes is not reliable, although this is rare. I did have a few occasions where when recording BF2142 with wegame, the tap test failed, yet the footage captured had all voices.
    • Once I find good recording settings, then I just play at those settings all the time whether recording or not. My ears adjust to the different game effect volumes and then whenever i want to record I can alt-tab and unmute the mic, alt-tab back into the game, tap test and then I am off recording.
    • If your best settings give some static then in some games you can cover it up, eg in Bad Company 2 you can turn on 'War Tapes' in audio options.
    • When recording your own voice, your mic is constantly open, so anything you may normally say off mic (eg swearing!) are recorded on the footage, so discipline what you say when you are not pushing to talk. Also if your breathing is being recorded then physically move your mic away from your mouth, eg up by your nostels or down under your chin, your voice will still be picked up but your breathing will not.
    Last edited by Exploding_Silver; 18.06.2011 at 13:01.

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